Do You Want to Save Your Marriage?

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In the last blog post, I asked if your marriage could be saved. Today the question gets a bit trickier.

Do you want to save your marriage?

Have you ever asked yourself that question?

When my first husband fell in love with someone else, I didn’t ask myself that question. I was too hurt and angry. I was being cheated on and abandoned.

And then one day in the midst of my sobs, my mom – who was never one to mince words, asked me this question.

“Are you upset about losing your husband, or your lifestyle?” Wow – way to kick someone when they are down. I felt like I had been slapped. It took about a year before I could appreciate mom’s honesty and directness. She was right.

But I didn’t have anyone to help me see that. My husband and I had grown complacent over our seven years together. We had taken each other for granted. We never argued. It was more like a slow death from neglect.

After six months and losing 20 pounds from being too heartsick (I thought) to eat – I was done.

By the time he came around, begging for a second chance – it was over for me.

Again, there was no one there to ask me the hard questions.

We didn’t have children. I was 27. I lost a baby during this process. I left convinced I was free of any responsibility.

The problem was, it meant I also left feeling somewhat like a victim. And that proved to be very detrimental when I remarried.

Getting clear about our truth, and what the next best step is for us – needs an objective perspective.

It needs someone who can lovingly ask hard questions we may not want to ask ourselves. Because until we can, it makes it almost impossible to move forward into something better.

Investing in ourselves – to get to the truth of who we are and what we want and need, as opposed to whatever stories we are telling ourselves – is the first step toward true joy, real contentment and true love.

Join me for a FREE masterclass on Thursday: Is Your Marriage Worth Saving?

You can grab your spot right here.

Kimberly Benjamin Houdebine